Content Ad 002

Daily Vocabulary Words: List of Daily Used Words in Leading Indian Newspapers
Hi there. Welcome to this special section @ Wordpandit. Our endeavour here is straightforward: highlighting daily vocabulary words that you would come across in leading newspapers in the country. We have included the following newspapers in our selection:
• The Times of India
• The Economic Times
• Hindustan Times
• Mint
• Indian Express
We are putting in extensive work to develop your vocabulary. All you have to do is be regular with this section and check out this post daily. This is your repository of commonly used words; essentially, we are posting a list of daily used words. Hence, this has significant practical application as it teaches you words that are commonly used in leading publications mentioned above.
Visit the website daily to learn words from leading Indian newspapers.

 

WORD-1: Lustre

CONTEXT: The global financial crash of 2008 was as much a crisis of economics as it was an economic crisis. Economists’ inability to foresee the crisis sowed doubts about their craft. As conventional theories lost lustre, a new branch of economics gained popularity.

SOURCE: Hindustan Times

EXPLANATORY PARAGRAPH: Imagine something that shines really bright and looks very pretty, like a shiny star or a sparkling diamond. That’s what ‘lustre’ is like. It’s when something has a special glow or shine that makes it look very special and beautiful.

MEANING: The appearance of shining with a soft, glowing light (noun).

PRONUNCIATION: LUH-ster

SYNONYMS: Gloss, Shine, Sheen, Radiance, Glow.

USAGE EXAMPLE:
1. The old coin still had its lustre.
2. She polished the silver until it regained its original lustre.
3. The lustre of the moonlight made the lake look magical.
4. The gemstone’s lustre caught everyone’s eye.

Insights Picture Vocabulary

WORD-2: Insights

CONTEXT: Combining insights from psychology and economics, behavioural economics offered a fresh approach to complex problems. It helped that one of the few finance experts to have predicted the crash, Robert Shiller, was a major proponent of behavioural finance.

SOURCE: Hindustan Times

EXPLANATORY PARAGRAPH: Insights are like secret understandings or super smart ideas about something. Imagine figuring out why your friend is sad without them telling you. That’s an insight – you understood something really well!

MEANING: Deep, often sudden understandings or intelligent thoughts about something (noun).

PRONUNCIATION: IN-sites

Content Ad 03

SYNONYMS: Understanding, Perception, Awareness, Discernment, Enlightenment.

USAGE EXAMPLE:
1. Her insights into the problem were very helpful.
2. The book offers interesting insights into the president’s life.
3. He gained new insights from the discussion.
4. The scientist shared his insights on the matter.

Proponent Picture Vocabulary

WORD-3: Proponent

CONTEXT: Combining insights from psychology and economics, behavioural economics offered a fresh approach to complex problems. It helped that one of the few finance experts to have predicted the crash, Robert Shiller, was a major proponent of behavioural finance.

SOURCE: Hindustan Times

EXPLANATORY PARAGRAPH: A proponent is like a cheerleader for an idea or a thing. This person really believes in it and tells other people they should like it or do it too. Like when you really like a game and tell your friends how great it is!

MEANING: Someone who supports a particular idea or plan (noun).

PRONUNCIATION: pruh-POH-nuhnt

SYNONYMS: Advocate, Supporter, Champion, Backer, Defender.

USAGE EXAMPLE:
1. She is a strong proponent of environmental protection.
2. As a proponent of healthy eating, he encourages others to eat vegetables.
3. The scientist was a proponent of the new theory.
4. He became a proponent of online education.

Fallible Picture Vocabulary

WORD-4: Fallible

CONTEXT: Shiller held that herd behaviour rather than rational calculations often drove financial investments, and went on to win the Nobel Prize in 2013. Another future Nobel Prize winner, Richard Thaler, proposed that policymakers should prod fallible citizens to make better choices in his 2008 book Nudge.

SOURCE: Hindustan Times

EXPLANATORY PARAGRAPH: Fallible means someone can make mistakes sometimes. Just like when you try really hard but still get something wrong. Everyone is fallible because nobody is perfect and everyone makes mistakes!

MEANING: Capable of making mistakes or being wrong (adjective).

PRONUNCIATION: FAL-uh-buhl

SYNONYMS: Imperfect, Error-prone, Human, Flawed, Mistakable.

USAGE EXAMPLE:
1. Even the best players are fallible.
2. We must remember that all humans are fallible.
3. As a fallible being, he admitted his errors.
4. The system, though good, is fallible.

 

WORD-5: Rigour

CONTEXT: Some behavioural scientists became uneasy with the turn their field was taking. Three of them — Uri Simonsohn, Joseph Simmons, and Leif Nelson — launched the Data Colada blog in 2013 to assess the validity and rigour of research in their field.

SOURCE: Hindustan Times

EXPLANATORY PARAGRAPH: Rigour is like doing something really seriously and carefully. It’s like when you take your time to build a big puzzle, checking every piece carefully. That’s doing it with rigour – being very detailed and not missing anything!

MEANING: The quality of being extremely thorough and careful (noun).

PRONUNCIATION: RIG-er

SYNONYMS: Strictness, Thoroughness, Precision, Stringency, Meticulousness.

USAGE EXAMPLE:
1. The research was conducted with academic rigour.
2. She approached her studies with great rigour.
3. The rigour of his training prepared him well.
4. There was a lack of rigour in the analysis.

 

WORD-6: Anomalies

CONTEXT: Two years ago, the bloggers detected evidence of data tampering in a research paper by Francesca Gino, a Harvard Business School professor. The blame fell on one of Gino’s co-authors, (another renowned behavioural economist Dan Ariely). Gino praised the bloggers for their “talent and courage” in uncovering “serious anomalies”. The paper was retracted.

SOURCE: Hindustan Times

EXPLANATORY PARAGRAPH: Anomalies are things that are different from what is usual or expected. Imagine finding a blue apple when all apples are usually red or green – that blue apple would be an anomaly because it’s not what you expect to see!

MEANING: Things that are unusual or do not fit in a regular pattern (noun).

PRONUNCIATION: uh-NOM-uh-lees

SYNONYMS: Irregularities, Aberrations, Oddities, Exceptions, Deviations.

USAGE EXAMPLE:
1. The scientist studied weather anomalies.
2. Anomalies in the data were investigated.
3. These symptoms are anomalies in the disease’s progression.
4. The anomaly stood out in the pattern.

Retracted Picture Vocabulary

WORD-7: Retracted

CONTEXT: Two years ago, the bloggers detected evidence of data tampering in a research paper by Francesca Gino, a Harvard Business School professor. The blame fell on one of Gino’s co-authors, (another renowned behavioural economist Dan Ariely). Gino praised the bloggers for their “talent and courage” in uncovering “serious anomalies”. The paper was retracted.

SOURCE: Hindustan Times

EXPLANATORY PARAGRAPH: Retracted is like when you pull something back or take back what you said. It’s like saying you found a dinosaur in your backyard and then saying, “Oops, I was wrong. There’s no dinosaur.” You retracted, or took back, what you said.

MEANING: Pulled back or taken back something that was said or written (verb).

PRONUNCIATION: ree-TRAK-ted

SYNONYMS: Withdrawn, Revoked, Recalled, Rescinded, Annulled.

USAGE EXAMPLE:
1. The newspaper retracted the incorrect statement.
2. He retracted his hand from the hot stove.
3. The author retracted her previous comments.
4. The allegations were later retracted.

Discrepancies Picture Vocabulary

WORD-8: Discrepancies

CONTEXT: Meanwhile, the bloggers found other discrepancies in Gino’s research and alerted her university. Harvard conducted its own investigation before suspending her in June.

SOURCE: Hindustan Times

EXPLANATORY PARAGRAPH: Discrepancies are like differences between things that should be the same. Imagine you and your friend counting your toy cars and you count 10, but your friend counts 11. That difference is a discrepancy because the numbers should match but they don’t.

MEANING: Differences or inconsistencies between things that should agree (noun).

PRONUNCIATION: dis-KREP-uhn-sees

SYNONYMS: Inconsistencies, Contradictions, Variances, Divergences, Disparities.

USAGE EXAMPLE:
1. They discussed the discrepancies in their reports.
2. Discrepancies between the two accounts raised questions.
3. The audit revealed several financial discrepancies.
4. Discrepancies in the evidence led to further investigation.

 

WORD-9: Reckoning

CONTEXT: If 2008 marked the rise of behavioural economics, 2023 marks a year of reckoning. The Gino-Colada affair has blown the lid off a simmering crisis in the field. Several famous studies have either been retracted or disputed in recent years.

SOURCE: Hindustan Times

EXPLANATORY PARAGRAPH: Reckoning is like counting or figuring something out. It can also mean when it’s time to explain or pay for what you did. Like if you took too many cookies, and mom says, “It’s time for reckoning,” she means you need to explain or maybe give some cookies back.

MEANING: The act of calculating or considering the consequences of actions (noun).

PRONUNCIATION: REK-uh-ning

SYNONYMS: Calculation, Estimation, Judgment, Appraisal, Assessment.

USAGE EXAMPLE:
1. The final reckoning showed they owed $500.
2. It was a moment of reckoning for his actions.
3. They were far apart in their reckoning of the expenses.
4. The election was a day of reckoning for the party.

 

WORD-10: Simmering

CONTEXT: If 2008 marked the rise of behavioural economics, 2023 marks a year of reckoning. The Gino-Colada affair has blown the lid off a simmering crisis in the field. Several famous studies have either been retracted or disputed in recent years.

SOURCE: Hindustan Times

EXPLANATORY PARAGRAPH: Simmering is like cooking something gently with little bubbles. It’s not boiling with big bubbles, just cooking slowly with tiny ones. Like when mom makes soup, she lets it simmer so it cooks just right without burning.

MEANING: Cooking or boiling gently just below the boiling point (verb).

PRONUNCIATION: SIM-er-ing

SYNONYMS: Stewing, Brewing, Heating, Bubbling, Steaming.

USAGE EXAMPLE:
1. The sauce was simmering on the stove.
2. Let the soup simmer for an hour.
3. The conflict had been simmering for years.
4. She felt anger simmering inside her.

 

 

Vocabulary PDF

Title: “Unwrapping Language Learning: Harnessing the Power of ‘Vocabulary PDF'”

In the digital age, the way we learn languages has transformed dramatically. Among the myriad of resources at our disposal, a ‘vocabulary PDF’ serves as an incredibly effective tool. It offers a structured, accessible and convenient method of enhancing our language skills. To maximize the potential of ‘vocabulary PDF’, it is crucial to understand how to make the most of it.

First off, when venturing through the process of learning with a ‘vocabulary PDF’, maintaining consistent learner engagement is pivotal. This involves regular revision sessions where you consistently go back and refresh your memory about previously learned words. This cyclic process is particularly effective in promoting long-term retention of the vocabulary.

While leveraging a ‘vocabulary PDF’, it’s also beneficial to annotate as you progress. Annotation brings an interactive aspect to your learning, making it dynamic and personalized. Make notes of context, synonyms, antonyms, or even create sentences using the new words. This engagement with the ‘vocabulary PDF’ aids in imbibing the meaning and usage of the words.

Another strategic approach to mastering a ‘vocabulary PDF’ is to utilize a reading aloud technique. Listening to the words as you speak them out loud can stimulate auditory learning, enhancing your pronunciation and comprehension of the vocabulary.

When using a ‘vocabulary PDF’, it is also advantageous to supplement your learning through applications of the new words. Write an essay, engage in a conversation, or post on social media using the new words. This reinforces the acquired vocabulary, augmenting your grasp over them.

In conclusion, a ‘vocabulary PDF’ is a potent instrument that, when harnessed effectively, can significantly bolster your language learning journey. It requires a blend of consistent revision, active annotation, auditory engagement, and practical application. With these strategies in hand, mastering ‘vocabulary PDF’ can be a rewarding and successful experience that fuels your linguistic endeavors.

Content Ads 02 Sample 01

Join our Free TELEGRAM GROUP for exclusive content and updates

Rsz 1rsz Close Img

Join Our Newsletter

Get the latest updates from our side, including offers and free live updates, on email.

Rsz Undraw Envelope N8lc Smal
Rsz 1rsz Close Img
Free Live Webinar Update