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Daily Vocabulary Words: List of Daily Used Words in Leading International Newspapers
Hi there. Welcome to this special section @ Wordpandit.
Our endeavour here is very simple: to highlight important daily vocabulary words, which you would come across in leading newspapers in the country. We have included the following newspapers in our selection:
• The New York Times
• The Washington Post
• Scientific American
• BBC
• The Guardian
• Psychology Today
• Wall Street Journal
• The Economist
We are putting in extensive work for developing your vocabulary. All you have got to do is be regular with this section and check out this post on a daily basis. This is your repository of words that are commonly used and essentially, we are posting a list of daily used words. Hence, this has significant practical application as it teaches you words that are used commonly in leading publications mentioned above.
Visit the website daily to learn words from leading international newspapers.

Enfranchisement Picture Vocabulary

WORD-1: Enfranchisement

CONTEXT: The overall effect is of an emphatic enfranchisement of the rights of people in Gaza.

SOURCE: Guardian

EXPLANATORY PARAGRAPH: Imagine if there was a rule that said kids couldn’t choose what games to play at recess, and then one day, they said you could choose too. That’s like “enfranchisement.” It means giving someone the right to vote or make decisions that they didn’t have before.

MEANING: The giving of a right or privilege, especially the right to vote (noun).

PRONUNCIATION: en-FRAN-chiz-ment

SYNONYMS: Empowerment, liberation, granting of rights, suffrage, citizenship

USAGE EXAMPLES:
1. The enfranchisement of women in the early 20th century was a significant milestone.
2. Movements for the enfranchisement of minority groups have shaped history.
3. Enfranchisement is a critical step towards equality.
4. The law for the enfranchisement of former slaves marked a turning point.

Persuasive Picture Vocabulary

WORD-2: Persuasive

CONTEXT: The ICJ case shows how western logic is wearing thin and its persuasive power waning in a multipolar world.

SOURCE: Guardian

EXPLANATORY PARAGRAPH: Imagine you really want a cookie, and you tell your mom all the reasons you should have one, like you cleaned your room and did your homework. If your mom gives you the cookie because of what you said, you were being “persuasive.” It means you’re good at convincing someone to do or believe something.

MEANING: Able to convince someone to do or believe something (adjective).

PRONUNCIATION: per-SWAY-siv

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SYNONYMS: Convincing, compelling, influential, effective, cogent

USAGE EXAMPLES:
1. She gave a persuasive speech on environmental protection.
2. His argument was so persuasive that everyone agreed with him.
3. Persuasive advertising is crucial for product success.
4. He used persuasive techniques to convince the audience.

 

WORD-3: Emblematic

CONTEXT: The court case is emblematic of a wider confrontation that seems to ask, from within the very same institutions that established it, if this human rights infrastructure is real, or just a theatre to be convened in the service of some international caste system.

SOURCE: Guardian

EXPLANATORY PARAGRAPH: Imagine wearing a team jersey that shows you are part of the soccer team. That jersey is “emblematic.” It means it represents something bigger, like being part of the team, just like symbols or signs can represent bigger ideas or groups.

MEANING: Symbolic, representative of a broader idea (adjective).

PRONUNCIATION: em-bleh-MAT-ik

SYNONYMS: Symbolic, representative, indicative, suggestive, typical

USAGE EXAMPLES:
1. The dove is emblematic of peace.
2. The old building is emblematic of the city’s rich history.
3. Their handshake was emblematic of their newfound agreement.
4. The scene was emblematic of the entire film’s theme.

Obstructing Picture Vocabulary

WORD-4: Obstructing

CONTEXT: By creating such a focal point for that shift, the case brought by South Africa has illustrated that perhaps it is those who are obstructing attempts to end the severe distress in Gaza who hold the fringe position.

SOURCE: Guardian

EXPLANATORY PARAGRAPH: Imagine you’re trying to walk through a hallway, but someone put a bunch of boxes in the way so you can’t get through. That person is “obstructing” the hallway. It means to block or get in the way of something or someone.

MEANING: Blocking or hindering something or someone (verb).

PRONUNCIATION: ob-STRUHK-ting

SYNONYMS: Blocking, hindering, impeding, thwarting, barring

USAGE EXAMPLES:
1. The fallen tree was obstructing the road.
2. He was charged with obstructing the investigation.
3. Obstructing traffic can lead to fines.
4. The new policy was seen as obstructing economic growth.

 

WORD-5: Reassurance

CONTEXT: the conditions that have allowed for this outbreak of ethical agreement, they could be as much a cause of concern as they are of reassurance.

SOURCE: Guardian

EXPLANATORY PARAGRAPH: Imagine being scared during a storm, and your big sister hugs you and tells you everything will be okay. That feeling of calm after she talks to you is called “reassurance.” It means someone makes you feel less worried or afraid by saying or doing something comforting.

MEANING: The action of removing someone’s doubts or fears (noun).

PRONUNCIATION: ree-uh-SHOOR-uhns

SYNONYMS: Comfort, encouragement, consolation, support, solace

USAGE EXAMPLES:
1. Her kind words provided much-needed reassurance.
2. He called his parents for reassurance before the exam.
3. The safety features of the car offer reassurance to drivers.
4. Patients often seek reassurance from their doctors.

 

WORD-6: Outpouring

CONTEXT: The outpouring appears to have been the result of a very unusual and particular confluence of factors.

SOURCE: Guardian

EXPLANATORY PARAGRAPH: Imagine a huge water balloon popping and water going everywhere. Now, imagine that with feelings, like when everyone in class gives you birthday cards and wishes. That’s an “outpouring.” It means a lot of something, like feelings or responses, coming out all at once.

MEANING: An expression of strong emotion; a large number of things produced rapidly (noun).

PRONUNCIATION: OUT-pohr-ing

SYNONYMS: Flood, deluge, surge, overflow, rush

USAGE EXAMPLES:
1. There was an outpouring of grief from the community after the tragedy.
2. The announcement triggered an outpouring of support on social media.
3. His retirement was met with an outpouring of respect and admiration.
4. The news prompted an outpouring of donations.

 

WORD-7: Ambiguity

CONTEXT: the absence of moral ambiguity. Few moral issues are entirely uncontroversial, and where there is disagreement, there cannot be the kind of groundswell of public opinion that has finally brought the Post Office scandal to the top of the political agenda.

SOURCE: Guardian

EXPLANATORY PARAGRAPH: Imagine someone asks you if you liked the cake, and you just shrug. They might not know if you mean “yes,” “no,” or “it’s okay.” That shrug has “ambiguity.” It means something is unclear or can be understood in more than one way.

MEANING: The quality of being open to more than one interpretation; inexactness (noun).

PRONUNCIATION: am-bih-GYOO-ih-tee

SYNONYMS: Uncertainty, vagueness, obscurity, unclearness, indistinctness

USAGE EXAMPLES:
1. The ambiguity of the poem makes it interesting.
2. Legal documents should avoid ambiguity.
3. His answer was full of ambiguity, leaving everyone confused.
4. They debated the ambiguity in the historical records.

Insidious Picture Vocabulary

WORD-8: Insidious

CONTEXT: The Conservatives have masterfully used immigration, for instance, to tell an insidious and divisive story about Britain and who belongs here.

SOURCE: Guardian

EXPLANATORY PARAGRAPH: Imagine a weed in the garden that starts very small and doesn’t seem like a problem, but then it grows slowly under the surface until it takes over everything. That weed is “insidious.” It means something spreads or grows very slowly but is harmful, like a bad habit that gets worse over time.

MEANING: Proceeding in a gradual, subtle way, but with harmful effects
(adjective).

PRONUNCIATION: in-SID-ee-us

SYNONYMS: Stealthy, sneaky, subtle, cunning, treacherous

USAGE EXAMPLES:
1. The disease is insidious, not showing symptoms until it is well established.
2. He warned against the insidious effects of the new policy.
3. Corruption can be an insidious influence within an organization.
4. The insidious spread of the invasive species alarmed the ecologists.

 

WORD-9: Gripping

CONTEXT: Too often the news agenda gets taken over by the newest, most gripping story at the expense of more significant ones.

SOURCE: Guardian

EXPLANATORY PARAGRAPH: Imagine reading a story or watching a movie that is so exciting that you don’t want to stop watching or reading. That’s called “gripping.” It means something is so interesting or exciting that it keeps your attention completely.

MEANING: Intensely exciting; holding one’s attention tightly (adjective).

PRONUNCIATION: GRIP-ing

SYNONYMS: Compelling, fascinating, enthralling, captivating, engrossing

USAGE EXAMPLES:
1. The book was so gripping that I read it in one sitting.
2. They watched a gripping documentary on wildlife conservation.
3. Her gripping performance earned her an award.
4. The news report was gripping and left everyone anxious to know more.

Appalling Picture Vocabulary

WORD-10: Appalling

CONTEXT: Many appalling things are happening every day in our world that require admitting complexity, compromising to reach solutions, and refusing to pin the blame on a few bad apples.

SOURCE: Guardian

EXPLANATORY PARAGRAPH: Imagine walking into a room and seeing it so messy that you can’t believe how bad it looks. That shock from seeing something very bad or shocking is called “appalling.” It means something is so dreadful or awful that it shocks or upsets you.

MEANING: Causing shock or dismay; horrific (adjective).

PRONUNCIATION: uh-PAWL-ing

SYNONYMS: Horrifying, shocking, dreadful, atrocious, horrendous

USAGE EXAMPLES:
1. The conditions in the camp were appalling.
2. They were shocked by the appalling crime.
3. The lack of concern shown by officials was appalling.
4. The food at the restaurant was appalling in both quality and taste.

 

 

Vocabulary Meaning and Examples

Title: “Diving Beyond Definitions: Exploring ‘Vocabulary Meaning and Examples'”

In the fascinating world of language learning, a method particularly impactful is learning ‘vocabulary meaning and examples’. Harnessing this dual approach of understanding words through definitions and relevant examples yields a sound vocabulary grasp. Let’s explore how we can effectively learn vocabulary using ‘meaning and examples’.

Foremost, recognizing ‘meaning and examples’ involves more than just a surface glance at the definition. It requires an engaged interaction with the word, placing it within a proper context. This enriches comprehension and facilitates an innate understanding of the word’s applications.

The process of learning ‘meaning and examples’ is made highly effective through varied resources. Reading literature, online articles, and language learning platforms offer numerous examples enriching the meanings. By frequently encountering a word in various contexts, the understanding of the ‘meaning and examples’ deepens, imprinting the word into long-term memory.

When learning ‘meaning and examples’, creating personal sentences is recommended. Develop your own examples using the given word. This personal connection between learned vocabulary and your everyday life context strengthens both familiarity and recall.

Moreover, taking notes while studying ‘meaning and examples’ goes a long way in mastering vocabulary. Jotting down the definition and a couple of examples for reference leads to better recall during revisions.

Finally, teach to learn. A tried-and-true method to solidify ‘meaning and examples’ is by explaining the word to someone else. This exercise forces you to articulate the word’s usage and understanding clearly, embedding it further in your memory.

In conclusion, the journey to learn ‘vocabulary meaning and examples’ is a rewarding process that involves a multifaceted approach. As you dive into the rich experience of understanding words through ‘meaning and examples’, you uncover the nuance and depth of language, enabling you to master it in its true sense.

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