Article Title: There’s No Such Thing as Behavior

 

Article Summary

The article at hand sees the author trying to understand ‘behaviour’ and differentiate it from what a person truly means to do at a given point in time. The author contests the opinion that behaviour can encapsulate a person’s psyche, saying that there exists two different mental processes in action inside any human at any point, and we from the outside see only one, which we term ‘behaviour’. There is an ideal one wants to achieve in their mind(which we cannot see), and her/his external behaviour is only a means to achieve that ideal. In that way, behaviour is ‘goaling’, a set of processes designed to achieve a goal. The author turns the noun ‘goal’ into this verb, explaining that goaling or behaviour is one human agent’s attempt to ensure that the world does not go by leaving her/his dreams by the wayside. When psychology understands this, and stops equating behaviour with full mental expression of man, it is bound to make progress, according to the author. He also writes that once humans have made this shift in thinking, they will be less preoccupied with the secondary, superficial behaviour, and better understand a person’s core goals and aims – and try to accommodate them, making the world more accepting of each human.

Article Link: Click here to read the full article

 

Words to learn from this article:

Conundrum: trouble, dilemma, conflict.

Nit-picking: the act of picking out small, insignificant faults with everything.

Circular: (here) things or processes that lead only to one other, providing no solution in the end.

Demarcated: marked out with boundaries.

Perplexed: confused, befuddled.

Illusory: something that is fictional, existing only in someone’s mind.


 

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